Reading: 2019 Resolution Nov. Edition

I am behind on my resolution of classics (still). I might not make it. I am going to put in a damn good effort though!! This is of course on top of my annual “I am going to try NaNoWriMo again” attempt. Completed: Frankenstein The Bell Jar My Sister’s Keeper The Phantom Tollbooth The Great Gatsby Wuthering Heights Attempted and failed: A Tale of Two Cities (for the upteenth time in my life!) Started: Kidnapped (Robert Louis Stevenson) audiobook downloaded from the library. The Left Hand of Darkness (Ursula K. LeGuin) downloaded from the library Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy) been listening to the audiobook (from Librivox) in the car. I am on Chapter 133 out of 238 which is 56%, but it’s on hold since Kidnapped came through. On hold/planned/gotten: Good Omens (Terry Pratchett, Neil Gaiman) downloaded the ebook from Google Play The God of Small Thing (Arundhati Roy) I am on hold with a copy from the library. Silence

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Work: Interview Questions I Love and Hate

I teach people how to interview.  Recently, this particular article swam through my emails of “hey, you seem to read these” (I do). I hate some of these questions. I tell managers to avoid asking them – and if you DO ask them, be prepared for a well-polished and prepared answer (and be warned if the candidate ISN’T prepared, but better to just avoid). That first question – Tell Me About Yourself – the article says don’t go off on a “personal” tangent. They essentially tell you to summarize your resume. BAH!  BAH I SAY. That is terrible advice – and I actually have always taught managers that if the candidate can’t or won’t get off their resume – it’s a yellow flag. Not a deal-breaker, it could be an act of nerves – but if you are looking for a candidate to build relationships it is a dangerous inability. I almost entirely disagree with this writer on how to

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Review: Elemental Mysteries

I was not expecting this series, A Hidden Fire, This Same Earth, The Force of Wind, and A Fall of Water to keep me engaged, but they did. Granted, the first one I enjoyed the most. Then there was a bit of “damnit, I don’t like leaving books unfinished.” This series is vampiric romance. Which if that isn’t a real genre – you all know what I’m talking about. There will inevitably be the comparisons to Twilight. I will start with that this series is about ten billion percent better than Twilight. Granted, I don’t see that as a terribly high bar to clear. I think my greatest disappointment is that Beatrice is a librarian, a historian, but it doesn’t really matter. She is set up to need this information, but it isn’t the final solution. Hell, she doesn’t actually use it that much. It’s there. It IS a plot point. I just wish it had been more. I am

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Review: Wuthering Heights

I do not understand the cult-love of Wuthering Heights. I can understand why it is chosen by high school English teachers across the country (globe?). It is solidly written with enough twists and turns to introduce students to early-19th century literature. It is NOT the best writing of the era. It is however possibly more powerful than some of the others. The characters of Wuthering Heights are generally all horrible people. There is little in the way of redeeming qualities in any of them. Many of them are selfish to the point of disgusting. The fact that Catherine and Heathcliff’s relationship is romantacized – it’s as bad as Twilight.  I really want to pull out the “signs of abusive relationship” and do a point-by-point of how many dots are on the page. It’s gross. GROSS. However, unlike Gatsby where I found myself going “why do teachers choose this” I think every teacher should cover Wuthering Heights. I spent about the

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Review: The Great Gatsby

I can understand why my high school honors English teacher chose not to have us read this book. It’s fine. But she knew it wouldn’t challenge those of us in her ninth grade and tenth grade honors English. As a tableau of the “roaring twenties” it’s pretty good. As a work of literature… it’s fine? This isn’t a book I would recommend to someone who doesn’t either have a teacher to walk through the context of the 1920’s OR a decent knowledge of the 1920’s because you’ve studied history. I say this because the alcohol flows like rivers throughout the peoples’ hands, but this is the height of prohibition – and that Gatsby is a bootlegger or helper of bootleggers is heavily implied even if it’s never verified. He smuggles alcohol. Frankly, none of the characters are good people. Not just because they guzzle down gin and brandy like it’s crack in the 80’s. They lie. They are selfish. They

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Review: The Phantom Tollbooth

This is a children’s book, but it was a really nice break from “normal” in my reading regime.  And DAMN, I wish I had been given this book when I was seven. This probably would have been one of those “classics” that I devoured over and over like Matilda. The premise is that Milo is bored. And then receives a mysterious present which promises entertainment.  With hefty sighs he passes through the tollbooth “toy” and soon finds himself drawn into adventure in the lands beyond Imagination. This book had to inspire Terry Pratchett.  The play on words is just too much for the man not to have read it and loved it (in my opinion). With places like Digitopolis and The Sea of Knowledge, which you cross by jumping to Conclusions.  It was punny. Occasionally, I almost groaned and then remembered who the audience is supposed to be. The pums are perfect for an audience of 7-10 year olds. This

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Reading: resolution update

I am behind on my resolution of classics. BUT I can still do this!! Completed: Frankenstein The Bell Jar My Sister’s Keeper Attempted and failed: A Tale of Two Cities (for the upteenth time in my life!) Started: The Phantom Tollbooth On hold/planned/gotten: The Great Gatsby (the library only has one copy in audiobook and someone else checked it out!) Silence I already have a copy. I just need to find it on one of my to-be-read piles. Wuthering Heights I’ve downloaded from Librivox (I’m currently listening to a silly series, but this is next on my phone for my driving needs). I CAN read 9 books in 4 months. God knows I’ve done it before. I have 7 “on deck” so to speak. Shockingly my library doesn’t have ebooks or audiobooks for A Clockwork Orange or The Grapes of Wrath. They have an ebook of The Left Hand of Darkness and with the new ipad ebooks are slowly being

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Review: My Sister’s Keeper

Holy Shit. That”s got to be the summary of my review of My Sister”s Keeper by Jodi Picoult. I cried through at least half this book. I literally would just sit with tears steaming down my cheeks because I couldn’t or wouldn’t close my eyes even to squeeze the tear ducts shut. This book would have hit me hard no matter what, but it definitely held a special twinge in my heart every time my son squirmed while I was reading. Every time he shifted in his sleep while I watch him. Every time I try not to imagine the horrible things that my anxiety-riddled brain likes to come up with. Anna is a protagonist in this story. The third child with an eldest brother and middle sister. Three years younger than her big sister. This mirrors my own life, Everything else might be different, but there are echos of familiarity. Older sisters tend to be a force in younger

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