Politics: Non-compete order

If you haven’t heard, President Biden has asked the FTC to ban non-compete contracts for workers. (Click here to read AP’s piece on it). THANK GOD. I have had a non-compete at almost every job I’ve ever worked at. Retail is probably the only exception. And I think for every job it has been BULLSHIT. I worked for a company that did helpdesk phone work. With a non-compete. Theoretically, I wasn’t allowed to take any other phone-based helpdesk role. Now, how enforceable was it? Probably not very, but there were a LOT of people hired at this company at 19 or 22 while they were in college or just after and they were extremely anxious that they weren’t allowed to look at other helpdesk roles when they were ready to look for better pay or benefits or commute…. Several took advantage of the “50-mile” rule (if you move more than 50 miles non-competes are harder to uphold?) and I only

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SCOTUS: I missed one

I missed a case being 9-0! Lange v. California. Again, this one is pretty clear-cut. A police officer turned on his lights to pull over a driver. The driver (Lange) was almost home and pulled into his garage. Lange then tried to claim the officer doing a sobriety test in his garage was a warrantless search. So the question became does the fourth amendment protect someone “fleeing” categorically justify a warrantless search? Especially a misdemeanor? The syllabus describes it thus: “The Fourth Amendment ordinarily requires that a law enforcement officer obtain a judicial warrant before entering a home without permission. But an officer may make a warrantless entry when “the exigencies of the situation,” considered in a case-specific way, create “a compelling need for official action and no time to secure a warrant.”” All of the justices voted the same, but most of the conservative men each had to give their own opinion… I wish I was kidding. Kagan (generally

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SCOTUS: Unanimous

So there have been 5 cases to have opinions put out in June 2021 with 9-0 (unanimous) decisions. Considering how much the media expects the court to be always and forever divided by political leaning/affiliations/appointment – what are the issues which the court stands all together on? I find these to be both relieving and enlightening. As of today (I think) these are the unanimous decisions. Some of them are “well, that seems obvious” for the decision. UNITED STATES v. COOLEY Issues: A tribal police officer has authority to detain temporarily and to search non-Indian persons traveling on public rights-of-way running through a reservation for potential violations of state or federal law. Background: Joshua James Cooley was pulled over and the tribal officer (James Saylor) who saw guns and a glass pipe and methamphetamines (all in plain view). Now, Saylor was not a federal or state officer and there was a question if he could stop and hold non-Indian people.

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SCOTUS: Opinions Unread so far

I am still playing “catch-up” on May and this week I’m seeing the Supreme Court put out opinions – and some of the headlines I’m reading are making me want to drop important chores (like dishes) to the wayside and find out how some of these judges are leaning and WHY. I know, I’m a nerd. So I am bookmarking the SCOTUS opinions page (https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/slipopinion/20 if you’re curious) and I am going to read and blog about at least some of the cases. I’ve already heard some commentary on the Van Buren v. United States case, but I am curious about the opinions – because Gorsuch, Barret, and Kavanaugh all sided with Sotomayor, Breyer, and Kagen. I will probably blog Sanchez v. Mayorkas and Garland v. Ming Dai together because they both deal with immigration (that’s about all I know, I’ve only read the abstracts). This isn’t my area of expertise, so we’ll see when I read them if they

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Politics: Black Lives Matter

I have mostly kept my hands off the keyboard on my blog on this issue. I’ve supported it since the beginning – but I am a white middle-class woman, I am not the voice people should be turning to on this issue. There are amazing black voices out there you should be turning to. Here are a few: Blair Amadeus Imani, Advocate, Historian, Organizer, Public Speaker, and Author I follow Blair on Instagram after I heard her Ted Talk “Queer & Muslim: Nothing to Reconcile”. She has this series called “smarter in seconds” where she covers a topic in very, very brief. Just enough to get me thinking. In writing for this blog post I found Blair also has a webpage which you may find useful. Ijeoma Oluo is a writer, speaker and internet yeller. She is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller So You Want to Talk About Race. (this is directly from her website) I follow Ijeoma on

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Politics: 51st Statehood?

There is a lot of discussion since before the 2020 election about adding certain territories as new states: Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. being the major ones discussed. I can’t speak for anyone else in the US, but for me when I read about the US having literal colonial territories it’s kind of squick. I’ve been reading about Puerto Rico’s various votes since the election to see if they even want statehood and… I think so? The 2020 referendum is the best result – 54% of all eligible voters turned out (which isn’t bad, only 62% of eligible voters turned out everywhere else and PR residents can’t vote for president so….) and 52.5% voted they wanted to be a state. I think that’s not an unreasonable referendum result. Puerto Rico should be a state. The only argument I hear against PR being a state is “it won’t be fair to the GOP, they will be outnumbered in the senate.” That

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Politics: I don’t want a big stimulus check, I want better

I didn’t say anything back in March 2020 about stimulus checks. They were a very fast solution to a serious problem. I think it was utterly appalling that there were so many issues getting people those checks…. but that is a different problem. I was very unhappy that the criteria was based on 2019 taxes – someone could have made $200,000 in 2019 but got laid off on March 13th. They just got screwed. It took me awhile to figure out why a second round of stimulus checks made my teeth itchy. Then one day when someone posted about landlords “should just have to suck it up” without that stimulus, some things began clicking into place. I realize what privilege I am speaking from that I say I don’t need a stimulus check. My husband and I have been able to transition to work-from-home. I limited my grocery trips to one hour once a week at one store to minimize

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Politics: School ReOpening

I work in corporate education. I have trained soft skills (customer service, management, and HR compliance training *shudders*) and I have trained “hard skills” in IT. I LOVE teaching Microsoft Excel certification training. Word is number two. Excel is probably my favorite because when people can use Excel, they almost universally like the application they hated the most and that is soooo gratifying. I have literally trained on a global scale. I have worked for multiple companies with locations in other countries. Both in developing training that isn’t in my time zone and delivering that training. This means I have worked with giving training in person and via a remote tool. I hope that this world will bring useful advances to schools. But there are some pretty bad pitfalls that the corporate world has learned. Which leads to my some advice for schools and teachers. Number 1: DO NOT MIX IT UP Learning can be done remotely. It is more

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Life Memories: John Lewis

I was in college when I first learned about John Lewis. I was doing some research regarding Georgia history and the civil rights movement (specifically some cases which started in Georgia). My professor made a comment about “Representative Lewis” and I blinked. It rocked me mentally to realize that someone still alive (and honestly not that old in 2005) had marched with Martin Luther King Jr. Marched as an adult. Not a child holding a parent’s hand. A man grown and finished with his education. Mathematically I knew this was possible. But this was the first time I felt it to my shoes. I didn’t know anything about John Lewis at the time. I didn’t grow up with him as my representative (honestly, I didn’t know who my rep WAS growing up so…. this wasn’t surprising). He was one of the people who inspired me to begin paying more attention to my local politics instead of just presidential. This meant

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